Document Actions

Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment

Up one level
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
Between 1919 and 1925 the “Officine Elettriche Genovesi” (O.E.G.), a large industrial company, built a hydroelectric plant in the municipality of Molare (Piedmont, north-western Italy). The reservoir created by the barrage of the Torrent Orba (hydrographic catchment of the River Po) by means of two dams had a capacity of 18 million m3. On the morning of 13th August 1935, after nearly ten years of operation, the rock sill on which one of the two dams had been constructed - named Secondary Dam of Sella Ze
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
The Sirino lake or Lago Sirino in Basilicata, Italy, is possibly a disaster waiting to happen, in some ways similar to the situation at Vaiont in the months and years leading up to the landslide there in October, 1963, with both precursor movements and expert opinion dismissed and not acted upon. The lake is retained in a basin, which is entirely contained within a fault-bounded and displaced block of Jurassic-age rocks, thought to be Schisti Selice. The lake is fed by precipitation on the adjacent mounta
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
The paper reports on the behaviour of the Alpe Cavalli dam, built in the Italian Alps between 1922 and 1926 and still in operation for electric power supply. The dam, which is 31 m high, made by dry masonry, is waterproofed by a multi-layered impervious facing, a concrete cut-off and a grout curtain in the foundation soils. The geological conditions of the dam site are quite peculiar since the reservoir location coincides with an ancient natural lake of glacial origin which was emptied, probably after the l
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
The Alps are the location of potentially catastrophic landslide-generated tsunami. Numerical modelling based on shallow water equations represents a valuable tool able to provide prediction in order to assess this threat. However, some inherent numerical problems (e.g. artefacts development when applied to real cases, difficulty for wet to dry bed transition) are well known, but not resolved yet. Our main objective is to find a method that is relevant for landslide-triggered tsunami modelling, as accurate a
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
In order to carry out a computer simulation of a flood originating in the case of a possible breakdown of the Sioni earth dam, the author has re-worked the algorithm of the Volna-2”, which allows, in the case of a possible breakdown of the dam, to calculate the wave velocity, the run-out distance according to the topography of river. In the case of a possible breakdown of the Sioni earth dam the population of the Iori valley as well as the areas adjoining the Iori River comes under great flooding. As to
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
We conjecture that in some cases, landslides impacting onto a water surface might acquire a vertical momentum that makes them slide horizontally at the water level, instead of plunging immediately into deep water, a process that we name surfing. An example of this behavior could be the recent (2002) landslide from the Sciara del Fuoco (Stromboli, Italy), which caused a tsunami with 10-15 meters high run-up waves. By examination of photographs, laboratory experiments, theoretical estimates, and numerical cal
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
In 1925 two dams were constructed across the Orba River to store water in Ortiglieto reservoir. The 13th of August 1935 the flood spillways of the main dam - Bric Zerbino - were unable to discharge the flood and both dams were overtopped. The main dam was not damaged while secondary dam - Sella Zerbino - collapsed. This paper describes in detail the rainfall event that caused the dam break and critically compares the historical peak discharge to the design discharges of the existing dams located in Northern
Topic 4 - Dams, landslides and their natural environment
In this paper a 3D numerical modeling of the wave generated by the Vajont slide is presented. In order to completely describe the complex flow generated by the slide a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique was adopted. To the best of the author knowledge this is the first attempt to describe the events adopting a fully 3D numerical model which discretizes the Navier-Stokes Equations. The SPH adopted herein is a meshless Lagrangian technique which is able to simulate the highly fragmented violent
Statistics