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Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena

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Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
A large DSGDS (Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation) which extends on an area of 3.75 km2 affects the southwest flank of Mount Ganderberg some 40 km north of Bolzano. The gravitational sagging of the slope is generating a wide field of tension cracks in the crown area where a rock slab of about 800.000 m3 shows clear precursory signs of possible detachment. In 1401 a rock avalanche detaching from the same area dammed the Passer River thus creating a 35 m deep lake which through sequential breaching
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
Today landslide science is more complete than at the time of the Vajont catastrophe, although some way from being perfect. However, a factor is still present that allowed the Vajont disaster, and a number of other catastrophes since, to occur - organisational and governmental reluctance to acknowledge the unacceptably high probability of a specific disaster and take actions to avert it. At three tourism centres in New Zealand there is substantive evidence that a large landslide can be triggered by an earthq
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
Large-scale water waves generated by landslides are one of the most dangerous events in reservoirs. Although the probability of occurrence is low, the consequences can be catastrophic as historical events have shown. The process of generation of the water waves is very complex, and has been studied with the aid of analytical, computational and physical models; empirical equations to estimate the characteristics of the water waves have been obtained depending on the parameters of the landslide. The paper pre
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
We present a classification system for hazard and risk that is posed by unstable rock slopes in Norway that might undergo catastrophic failure in future and can cause loss of life. The system is scenario-based as the intensity and rate of displacement, as well as the geological structures activated by the sliding rock mass vary significantly on the slopes. In addition, for each scenario the secondary effects, such as generation of displacement waves or landslide damming of valleys with the potential of late
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
The Oppstadhornet rockslide is a 10 Mm3 slide that occurs on the island of Otrøya in westernmost Norway. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating indicates that the Oppstadhornet rockslide became active ca. 16.6-14.2 kyrs ago when the retreat of the Scandinavian ice sheet exposed the island from the continental ice cover. Sliding along the main sliding surface was active during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Our data suggest that the paleo-slip rate in the Late Pleistocene was slightly faster than in the
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
Within the Innfjorddalen valley (Møre og Romsdal, Norway) a 1.5 km long linear NNE-SSW striking feature, forming a 3-4 m high step in the topography, occurs on the SE facing slope of the Middagstinden mountain and was previously discussed as a Holocene reverse fault, called the "Berill fault". Our intense structural field mapping and a high resolution digital elevation model based on LiDAR data derived from airborne and terrestrial laser scanning indicate that the "Berill fault" is a normal fault that has
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
Large landslides are a common geomorphological characteristic of the Moldavian Plateau (Romania), their presence and manifestation being favored mainly by geological and climatic conditions. In numerous cases, the spatial pattern of the large landslides is under the form of amphitheatres, with impressive dimensions, reaching sizes of hundreds of hectares. Due to their defensive characteristics, these landforms often constituted sites for settlements location during the Middle Ages. The constant growing of t
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
Large landslides are a common geomorphological feature of the Central Andes of Chile and Argentina. The highlands usually present landslide relicts of different types and volumes located in glacial valleys, including outsized rock slides and avalanches of millions of cubic metres up to cubic kilometres of volume. Even though the main trigger mechanisms of these events are not clear yet, being mostly interpreted as seismic in Chile and ambiguously climatic or seismic in Argentina, there is no doubt about the
Topic 2 - Predicting large landslide phenomena
The 1963 Vajont disaster highlighted the importance of slopes stability analysis not only directly at the dam sites but also in the reservoir areas to ensure hydraulic projects safety. However, catastrophic collapse of huge rock/soil mass into reservoir does not exhaust negative effects of landslides that must be taken into consideration in the course of dams design. Severe consequences might result from river channel landslide damming both downstream from the dam site and far upstream from the reservoir. T
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