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Keynotes
Rockslides can appear in a large variety of types and with different characters which make difficult their understanding and the prediction of their behaviour. This contribution highlights some of the most important steps in rockslide monitoring and modeling showing the relationships between them. Monitoring is a fundamental step in the understanding of such phenomena. The analysis of the possible types of failure and collapse are extremely important especially when a rapid acceleration, a successive transf
Keynotes
Keynotes
We explore two landslide triggering mechanisms that are associated with time-dependent, cyclic loading of the sliding interface. The first is shear strength degradation due to seismic shaking leading to velocity weakening of the sliding interface. We show how a block that is initially at a state of static limit equilibrium under constant gravitational load may undergo sliding at increasing velocities when subjected to cyclic vibrations and demonstrate, using shaking table experiments, how the observed shear
Keynotes
The statics and dynamics of the Vaiont Slide have been studied using several models based on the theory of Limit Equilibrium, in two and three dimensions. The analyses confirmed the need to consider low bedding-parallel strength of much of the rupture surface, combined with high piezometric pressures. The role of internal strength of the rock mass is also important, to a degree that depends on the mobilization of rock mass cohesion. The slide was asymmetric and laterally constrained and is likely to have de
Keynotes
The 1963 Vajont disaster represents by far the largest landside-related accident associated with a dam or reservoir in recorded history. Since then, those involved in planning and constructing large dams and reservoirs have taken measures to ensure that this event is not repeated. In general this has been successful, with no events with losses on a similar scale. However, landslides have continued to present a substantial challenge to those involved in the design and construction of large dams. In the first
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Besides existing landslide-dammed lakes there is evidence of former cases in the high-mountain areas of Europe, Asia and America. In the Holocene, large landslides have repeatedly dammed lakes. Numerous prehistoric, historic and recent cases are evident where the dams could not resist the pressure of the impounding water. The result were flood waves characterized by particularly high peak discharges and long travel distances, leading to disasters where interfering with populated lands downstream. Even thoug
Keynotes
Our understanding of the mechanics of large landslides has improved considerably over the last decade with the development of new, innovative data collection methods, in conjunction with efforts to acquire unique data sets through detailed monitoring of several large rock slopes and the integration of these with increasingly sophisticated computer modelling techniques. In this paper the authors examine these recent developments in the context of three major issues that are considered fundamental to improved
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