GEOLOGICAL RISKS IN LARGE CITIES: THE LANDSLIDES TRIGGERED IN THE CITY OF ROME (ITALY) BY THE RAINFALL OF 31 JANUARY-2 FEBRUARY 2014 — IJEGE
 
 
You are here: Focus and scope Issues from 2005 to 2017 IJEGE 14 IJEGE 14 - Volume 01 GEOLOGICAL RISKS IN LARGE CITIES: THE LANDSLIDES TRIGGERED IN THE CITY OF ROME (ITALY) BY THE RAINFALL OF 31 JANUARY-2 FEBRUARY 2014
Document Actions

GEOLOGICAL RISKS IN LARGE CITIES: THE LANDSLIDES TRIGGERED IN THE CITY OF ROME (ITALY) BY THE RAINFALL OF 31 JANUARY-2 FEBRUARY 2014



Abstract:
An exceptional rainfall battered the city of Rome from 31 January to 2 February 2014. The event had variable intensity and duration in the different parts of the city. The exceptionality of the event lies in the intensity of rainfall cumulated in 6 hours (return period > 50 years) and in its uneven distribution over the urban area. The event triggered a number of landslides of different type, which caused substantial damage. Researchers from the Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Geologici (Research Centre on Prediction, Prevention and Control of Geological Risks - CERI) of Sapienza University of Rome carried out field & remote surveys and assessments immediately after the event. The team detected and inventoried 68 landslides, mostly occurring in the sandy and sandy-silty deposits of the Monte Mario, Ponte Galeria and Valle Giulia Formations. The complete inventory of the landslides is accessible via WebGIS on CERI’s website http://www.ceri.uniroma1.it/cn/landslidesroma.jsp. The spatial distribution of the landslides evidences that 69% occurred in clastic deposits of sedimentary origin and only 6% in volcanic deposits. This finding disagrees with more general statistical data, based on the inventory of Rome’s historical landslides, indicating that 41% of slope instabilities occur in volcanic deposits and only 11.7% in sedimentary ones. In the data reported here, this apparent contradiction is justified by the fact that most the rainfall under review was concentrated in the north-western portion of Rome’s urban area, whose hills accommodate outcrops of dominantly sedimentary deposits from Plio-Pleistocene marine and continental cycles.

Authors:
Dario Alessi - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Francesca Bozzano - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Andrea Di Lisa - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Carlo Esposito - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Andrea Fantini - Tecnostudi Ambiente s.r.l. - P.zza Manfredo Fanti, 30 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Adriano Loffredo - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Salvatore Martino - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Francesco Mele - Regione Lazio - Dipartimento Istituzionale e Territorio - Direzione Regionale Infrastrutture, Ambiente e Politiche abitative - Centro Funzionale Regionale - Via Monzambano, 10 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Serena Moretto - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Alessandra Noviello - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Alberto Prestininzi - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Paolo Sarandrea - Tecnostudi Ambiente s.r.l. - P.zza Manfredo Fanti, 30 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Gabriele Scarascia Mugnozza - Sapienza Università di Roma - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e Centro di Ricerca per i Rischi Gelogici (CERI), P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Luca Schilirò - PhD student - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra - P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Chiara Varone - PhD student - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra - P.le A. Moro, 5 - 00185 Roma, Italy
Keywords
Rome, exceptional rainfall in 2014, landslides, inventory, WebGIS
Statistics